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Author: Paulette Southerly

AAPD/NCIL Presidential Candidate Questionnaire

Posted in Advocacy, Disability, and Public Awareness

In 2020, approximately 23% of the American electorate — over 35 million individuals — will be people with disabilities. As people with disabilities, we want to live independent lives and contribute our talent and energy to the future success of our great nation. There are over 60 million Americans with disabilities who make remarkable and valuable contributions to our communities.

In an effort to inform the disability community of the presidential candidate’s disability policy positions, initiatives, and priorities, the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), the National Council on Independent Living (NCIL), and the REV UP Campaign have developed a presidential candidate questionnaire. Click here to download a copy of the questionnaire (plain text version). So far, the following candidates have completed the questionnaire: Steve Bullock, Pete Buttigieg, Tim Ryan, Bernie Sanders, Joe Sestak, and Marianne Williamson.

Please visit aapd.com for full responses.

Vera Institute of Justice’s Center on Victimization and Safety Toolkit Survey

Posted in Advocacy, Public Awareness, and Research

The Vera Institute of Justice’s Center on Victimization and Safety works to ensure that traditionally under-served victims of crime have equal access to victim services and criminal justice interventions. We do this by fostering collaboration among and building the capacity of victim service organizations, population and/or culturally specific service providers, and the criminal justice system. The Center combines research, technical assistance, and training to help policymakers and practitioners’ close gaps in systems and ensure that all survivors of violence have access to the services and support they need and want.

Working in partnership with the Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, the Center on Victimization and Safety is currently creating an online toolkit for a range of audiences. One part of the toolkit is looking at the experiences of people with disabilities with the disability service system.  We are looking to include some short quotes from those who use these systems to help others learn.

If you are interested in sharing and are willing for us to use your first name and where you are from (city/state) we would really like to include your words. Here are some things we would like to know:

1.      How easy is it for you to find disability services where you live? (please indicate whether you are in an urban or rural area) Do you have a lot of choices or is it more limited?

2.      How easy is it for you to travel to disability services where you live? Are services accessible via public transportation? Do you have public transportation? What would be a typical travel time to get to the services?

3.      Is there anything unique about the disability services in your area? Something that is specific to you community.

4.      What are some of the things you really like about the services? What are things that you might not like?

5.      Are there any barriers you face getting disability services in your area?

6.      If you have lived and received services from multiple places (if you have lived in other states, or counties or countries), how would you compare them?

I know this is short notice but please reply to me by September 6th.

Please feel free to share with others.

Leslie Myers, MS, CRC, CCDVC
Senior Program Associate
Vera Center on Victimization + Safety
1111 14th St NW, Suite 920
Washington, DC 20005
T: (630) 486-3367

C: (646) 530-3523
Fax: (202) 941-9407
E-mail: lmyers@vera.org
AIM: Leslie at Vera

www.endabusepwd.org

Why the Census Matters for People with Disabilities

Posted in Advocacy, Disability, and Public Awareness

From https://www.ndrn.org

Key Takeaways

The decennial census is the constitutionally mandated count of all residents of the United States.

  • Census data help direct more than $800 billion a year in federal funding, including for key programs that support and protect the rights of people with disabilities.
  • The Census Bureau considers people with disabilities hard to count. However, the bureau has taken steps to make participation more accessible.
  • Stakeholders can help ensure a fair and accurate count of people with disabilities. Community organizations can, for example, play a vital role as trusted partners in conducting effective outreach.

For the full text, please visit https://www.ndrn.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/People-with-Disabilities-Brief.pdf or see the embedded PDF below.

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“Different Voices and Common Experiences” accepting submissions

Posted in Disability, Outreach, and Public Awareness

Different Voices and Common Experiences is an exhibit featuring artists who have been affected by mental health issues.  DVCE supports positive mental health awareness, community wellness, and inclusivity.

Completed application deadline is Friday, June 14th, 2019.

No late applications will be accepted.

Visual Artists:

Artists will be chosen on a first-come basis until the gallery space is full or deadline is met.  You must submit photographs of your art pieces (limit 3 per artist) with your completed application. One piece of artwork will be chosen as the “feature” to be used for the postcards, posters and the show program.

Performing Artists:

Performers (poets, musicians, etc.) are welcome to share their talent during the opening night reception (Friday, August 9th).  Performing artist applications will also be received on a first-come basis until the time available is full.  To request a slot, please contact Paulette Southerly.

Opening Night Reception:

There will be a free public reception on Friday, August 9th, 2019 from 5:30 – 7:30 PM. Participating artists and the community are encouraged to attend to enjoy the visual and performance art with wonderful company.  Refreshments will be available. 

Set-Up and Take-Down:

Visual artists must deliver their work to the Mon Arts Center at 107 High Street in Morgantown on Monday, August 5th between 11:30 am – 7 pm. Artwork must arrive on time to be shown. All work must be picked up from the Mon Arts Center Tuesday, September 3rd between 11:30 am – 7 pm.  ARTISTS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR DELIVERY AND PICKUP OF THEIR PIECES.

Questions?  Call Paulette Southerly at 304.296.6091 or 1.844.212.3464 or email psoutherly@nwvcil.org

Application can be downloaded here: http://nwvcil.org/dvce-application/

Join Advocates across the Country Tomorrow to #StopTheShock

Posted in Advocacy, and Public Awareness

From NCIL:

Tomorrow, April 24, marks five years since the FDA’s hearing on the graduated electronic decelerator (GED) shock devices used at the Judge Rotenberg Center (JRC). They found the device to cause serious harm and a ban was recommended. Since then, proposed regulations have been published and promises have been made, but the ban still hasn’t been finalized. Decades of advocacy have gotten us this far, and we need to keep the pressure on the FDA to release the ban and #StopTheShock! NCIL is proud to support the Autistic Self Advocacy Network’s #WeAreStillWaiting Campaign and tomorrow’s Day of Action to speak out against the torture and abuse inflicted on our disabled siblings at the JRC. We hope you will join advocates around the country by taking action and demanding the FDA #StopTheShock. Let them know that #WeAreStillWaiting by taking action in one of the following ways:

  • Go to your local wait-in. Advocates at ASAN’s 10 wait-ins will come together to engage their communities in the fight to #StopTheShock. Wait-ins can involve anything from handing out flyers to writing letters.
  • If you can’t make a wait-in in person, join the virtual wait-in! They’ll be making calls, sending emails, and more throughout the day, with scripts and tips available.
  • Call or email the FDA and tell them to release the ban on electric shock devices.
  • Call or email your elected officials and tell them to sign a letter asking the FDA to #StopTheShock.
  • Use social media to spread the word and get your friends involved, and make sure to use the hashtags #WeAreStillWaiting and #StopTheShock! Check out ASAN’s social media kit (PDF) for more ideas. One way to get involved on social media is to take a selfie showing where you are waiting for the FDA to release the rule, and encourage your friends to join you.
  • Write an op-ed or letter to the editor for your local newspapers, and let your neighbors know what they can do to #StopTheShock.